Physical Readiness by Teri

 

There’s no surprise that certain professions require you to maintain a certain physical fitness standard and the military, firefighting, and police are just a few…and I’ve happened to have done all three. But what about when you no longer are in those professions? What if those professions don’t apply to you but you want to ensure you maintain a certain level of physical readiness for everyday life? What if you want to ensure you are prepared for the unexpected?

 

The U.S. Army defines Physical Readiness as the ability to meet the physical demands of any combat or duty position, accomplish the mission, and continue to fight and win. So what’s our current combat or duty position? MF life.

 

So where do we start?

 

It’s important to consider a few different areas:

 

-Consider physical fitness - a combination of aerobic (cardio) and anaerobic (lifting and sprinting) exercises to optimize performance. Do you hate fucking running? Yeah, I do too. But I do it. Why? Because I don’t know what tomorrow holds but whatever it is, I’m going to be ready for it. But high-intensity interval training (HIIT) workouts will get you in some solid cardio shape, too. And don’t avoid lifting: strength plays a factor. Regardless of what area of physical fitness you may be interested in, be sure to mix it up. Don’t fall into the trap of doing the same thing, because your body will become imbalanced and you will end up with injuries. Cross training is key, not just to ensure you are well-balanced but to keep it interesting and to avoid burn out.  If you want to up your game: wear a weighted vest. Life isn’t perfect and if shit hits the fan I don’t think you’ll be without at least a bug-out-bag or some level of gear/equipment that will be going with you.

 

-Consider self-defense. This is where a lot of people might not have a lot of experience. Sure, most people have gone to a gym at some point, but who has taken karate, a self-defense course, jiu jitsu, krav maga? Yes, these are advanced things to think about. The world has been a little crazy as of late and not everyone can afford training in these areas nor are many being offered in person, I get it. I DON’T recommend watching YouTube and practicing choke holds on your roommate. Let’s not be stupid. I DO recommend looking into a local YMCA or similar community organization or doing a simple google search in your area for free self-defense courses or organizations. And this doesn’t just apply to you, it applies to your spouse and children, too. I apologize in advance, because as of late so many courses are free to women and kids aren’t accessible to men.

 

-Consider self-defense on another level: Firearms. If you own one, I sure as hell hope you practice with it…in a safe and dedicated environment for it, of course. If you don’t practice with it: you need to. If you do practice with it: practice more. You might only need to use a firearm one time in your life, if ever. When that time comes, you better know what you are doing with it. I’m not saying you need to be at a competitive shooter status, but feel comfortable, feel confident, and be proficient not just in shooting but in working through common firearms malfunctions – because as Murphy’s Law would have it, something will totally malfunction that one time you didn’t need it to.

 

-Consider mindset. Your mind is your worst enemy if it’s not working in your favor. We are our worst critics and worst supporters all at the same time. I’d recommend a few books on improving mindset, to include:

- AMRAP Mentality, by Jason Khalipa

- Can’t Hurt Me, by David Goggins

- Resilience: Hard-won wisdom for living a better life, by Eric Greitens

- The Micro Resilience Book, by Bonnie St. John and Allen P. Haines

 

 

Do you have no idea where to start? I get that, too. Listen…you aren’t going to live forever. While you are on this earth, live your life in the best ways that you can. Above all things: if you don’t have your health you literally have nothing.

 

I’m dropping a link to a FREE app that can get you started on a free workout plan to get your shit together. Fill out your information, select your food preferences, and select what workout plan works for you – there’s even an at-home option if you don’t have access to a gym or equipment and there’s a paid premium version of that app that gives you even more options. This app is all-inclusive. It will breakdown exactly how many calories you should be eating and will break down your food into how much protein, carbs, and fats you should eat. You can track your workouts and food in it. If you are having trouble navigating any part of the app, you can actually message me on it (via the premium version) and I can help you through it. I also run a private FB group that you can jump in on for even more resources, info, and motivation. Did I mention this is all for free? I’m not kidding. I DO use the premium version of the app, myself, and it’s completely worth the measly $4 a month – I can give up a cup of coffee in exchange for my health.

 

https://www.1stphorm.app/Teri

 

Most importantly: ask for help. That’s hard for anyone to do, but we all come from different backgrounds, professions, life experience. We don’t all know how to navigate these things on our own. Keep learning. Keep pushing yourself. Ask for help.

 

 

Stay Safe, Stay Strong, Go Crush Some Shit.

-T

 

jointopsfitness@yahoo.com

@weights_and_watercolors   (IG)

 

 

6 comments

  • Legit article, Teri! This is invaluable information, and something that this world needs to find a foundation in. Physical readiness not only benefits our health, but provides mental security through the knowledge that we are physically capable of handling what’s thrown at us.

    David
  • Good infomation, maybe it will help this crippled old man with all the surgeries Ive had

    JOHN GIST
  • Awesome information, as someone who has had multiple surgeries and suffer from major back issues, I could use a program like this to try and get in some sort of shape to help with the pain associated with all the surgeries. I will follow these posts and see what may be beneficial. Thanks!

    JOHN J GIST
  • That question that is from Lou Jake Pittelli.. thats from a page here on FB that I closed down.
    so same "?’,,, from Uhtred Jake Italiano… me twin brutha. same email and thanks.. or is it “NO QUESTIONS ANSWERED” ???

    Uhtred Jake Italiano
  • Will it be good for a 68 year old guy. who is still at my fight’n weight of 195 and my BMI is 24. I have Boxed for physical fitness (as an exercise) for over 35 years. but the last 5 years have not done it much. have surprised a few young punks over the years with what I know and use. but have always helped them up after they got knocked on their ass and very confused.

    Louis Jake Pittelli

Leave a comment

Please note, comments must be approved before they are published